Inspired Scaffolding - Different types of scaffolding in construction

What are the different types of scaffolding used in construction?

When it comes to types of scaffolding, it may shock you to know that there are actually many different varieties we use in our everyday construction. Dependent on what work is being carried out, this changes what type of scaffolding is needed to help carry out the job to meet health and safety regulations. We’ve put together a handy list below so you can see what different types of scaffolding are used in construction:

  1. Putlog Scaffolding
  2. Independent scaffolding
  3. Suspended scaffolding
  4. Cantilever scaffolding
  5. Trestle scaffolding
  6. Design scaffolding
  7. System scaffolding

Putlog Scaffolding

Commonly used for brick masonry work, this type of scaffolding has also been dubbed the “bricklayers scaffold”. This is commonly comprised of standards (the vertical poles that carry the majority of the weight) that have been fixed securely to the ground roughly two and a half metres apart. Ledgers (horizontal braces) are then used to join the standards, whilst the putlogs are placed between the wall and the standard for extra support.

 

Independent Scaffolding

Independent scaffolding is usually used for stone masonry work which is why it has also been given the name of “mason’s scaffolding”. It is also referred to as “double scaffolding”. This stems from the fact that this scaffolding structure stands independently from the wall being a self supporting framework.

Due to it being tougher to make holes within the wall for supporting putlogs, a double scaffold uses two frames of standards that are erected close to the wall. Transoms are used in order to give more support to the structure.

 

Suspended Scaffolding

Suspended scaffolding, as the name suggests, is scaffolding that is being suspended from rooftops. Usually used by painters, redecorators or for specific repair works, a platform is suspended down the side of a building with the use of chains and ropes. This type of scaffolding has the unique ability to move up and down to change the desired level.

 

Cantilever Scaffolding

Cantilever scaffolding or “needle scaffolding” is used when it isn’t possible to erect a scaffolding structure based on the ground. This is commonly used when the job can’t interfere with that’s going on below, e.g. traffic.

Instead of using standards, the scaffolding standards are supported by needles (usually made from timber) that are put into the walls of the structure. Vertical struts are used between the needles to stop them from coming away from the wall.

 

Trestle Scaffolding

A trestle scaffold is used for when the job is indoors undergoing things like repainting or minor ceiling repairs.  This is a board suspended between two tripods. Sometimes wheels can be used at the bottom of the tripods to make the platform movable. This is why trestle scaffolding is sometimes called “mobile scaffolding” or “rolling scaffolding”. Usually this type of job is used when the work is up to 5m or so high.

 

Design scaffolding

This style of scaffolding are flatpack style constructions that are available to buy in the industry. They follow readymade designs that are easy to assemble using semi-skilled labour, the only drawback is the versatility as some models are not easily adjustable to different uses.

 

System Scaffolding

This type of scaffolding is similar to independent scaffolding, but uses a proprietary fixing system. A system scaffold can be quick to erect and remove the need for using numerous fitting connections. The interlocking components create standardised bays.

 

If you’re not sure which option is best to use, there’s no need to worry. Our fully qualified and accredited staff are on hand to assess the situation and help figure out just what type of scaffolding you need. Contact us now to find out how we can help!

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